Event Details

Zoom Meeting

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2 November 2022
12:30pm - 1:30pm AEDT

Zoom Meeting

Event Icon

2 November 2022
12:30pm - 1:30pm AEDT

Presenters:

Prof Roianne West
Chief Executive Officer I CATSINaM

Born and raised Kalkadoon on her grandmother’s ancestral lands in North West Queensland with connections to the Djunke/Djaku-nde peoples in South West Queensland. Roianne continues a family legacy of four generations of Aboriginal nurses and a long line of healers that include her mother, a twin sister and a brother who are Registered Nurses and twin daughters who are studying Nursing and Midwifery.



Event Dates

Date: 2 November 2022
Time: 12:30pm – 1:30pm AEST

Location

Zoom Meeting

Murra Mullangari Program - Cultural Safety and Cultural Humility Educations

Improving Value in Healthcare

Zoom Meeting


About

What do you know already about Cultural Safety and Cultural Humility ?
Murra Mullangari developed by The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM)  is the first Indigenous-developed Cultural Safety and Humility program for practising nursing and midwifery specifically.
The term ‘Cultural’ in Cultural Safety  is not about cultural identity, ethnicity or traditions. Rather, it’s about the ‘culture’ of power.

The program is one aspect of  life-long learning towards achieving Cultural Safety and Cultural Humility in Nursing and Midwifery practice, especially when caring for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. It also contributes to eliminating racism and addressing inequities in Nursing and Midwifery workforce and in health outcomes. Clinically safe practice is not possible without culturally safe practice

It has been developed and informed by research and key literature including Dr Irihapeti Merenia Ramsden PhD thesis: Cultural Safety and Nursing Education in Aotearoa and Te Waipounamu(link is external)

Greg Rickard, Professor of Health at the University of Tasmania and one of 26 people who was a participant in the pilot of Murra Mullangari, said the program challenged non-Indigenous health practitioners to look at Cultural Safety and Cultural Humility from “a power perspective” to understand the impact of colonisation and racism on healthcare for Indigenous patients.

“My hope is that, together with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, we can start to understand and address the many factors impacting on Closing The Gap on health inequalities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.

The Murra Mullangari program takes us all on a journey, no matter what our knowledge and experience we may have working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.”

Professor Roianne West was Australia’s first Nursing Director in a tertiary hospital with a dedicated portfolio of Indigenous Health and Australia’s first Professor of Indigenous Health in a joint appointment between a state health service and a University School of Nursing and Midwifery, Foundation Chair in First Peoples Health, Director of the First Peoples Health Unit and the inaugural Dean of First Peoples Health at Griffith University. She is an active researcher who leads the Yuwan Gulgan study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Cultural Safety Education and Training at Griffith University which aims to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health and Cultural Safety education and training through an Indigenous Research lens.

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